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Columbia River kayak sailing is great fun

Coastal Oregon Fun

October 23rd, 2014 by

Hi everyone!
This is a transition month here in Hood River.  The predictably strong westerlies that sweep through the gorge all summer, begin to give way to the more variable winds of winter.

This is the time of year that Patti and I like to go camping on the Oregon coast.  While the weather is often unpredictable, the scenery is spectacular and always well worth the drive.   Below are some photos taken from a recent trip to Netarts and Nahelam bays.  These lovely bodies of water are about a two and a half hour drive from Hood River.  If we do our homework and time the tides correctly, the paddle-sailing can be amazing.  An incoming tide is the ticket.

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Here is Patti’s sweet new boat, beached a Nehalem State Park.  It’s a Tahe, Reval Mini LC.   Lots of rocker and  very lively under sail!

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Following Patti on a starboard tack across the bay.

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A dramatic rain squall descends on Netarts Bay.

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This is the sandy western shore of Nehalem bay.  Deb is in the water cooling off.   A dry suit is a wonderful piece of safety equipment, but it can sometimes get hot when the sun comes out.

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Pelicans and gulls just “chillin” on the Netarts Jetty.  A fancy house is seen in the background.

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There are few things more pleasant than gliding across a bay.

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Dan is seen here eeking out a very light breath of air near the boat ramp of Nehalem State Park.  You can’t see it in the photo, but giant Chinook salmon were jumping all around us.  It is the time of year that these mighty fish migrate up the rivers in huge schools to spawn.

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Yours truly, inside of the mouth of Nehalem inlet.  The surf was quite large this day.  Breaking over the inlet bar, the waves created large fields of sea foam to play in.   It’s kind of like kayaking in a giant bubble bath!

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Here we are sailing on a close reach across Netarts.  We saw the fog in the distance rolling, like waves in from the ocean, blanketing the southern end of the bay.

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This was the perfect spot to take a  lunch break, just inside Nehalem inlet.

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Sea life and salt air.  Ahh…

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The drive home.  Daisy is keeping an eye out for chipmunks on the road.  It’s a tough job, but someone’s got to do it.  🙂

We hope  you enjoyed the photos.

Fair Winds and Happy sailing!

New Y40 Foam Mounting Cradles

October 14th, 2014 by

P1050163These ultra-high density, waterproof, foam mounting cradles give support to the cross tube as well as do a fine job of holding the main body tube on the center-line of a peaked, or shaped foredeck.

The Y40 foam is much better than the gray, Minicell foam commonly found in outfitting shops, mainly because it provides superior support.  It can also be easily shaped with a sharp knife and sand paper for a custom finish.

These mounting cradles work well on many skin-on-frame boats where drilling holes for mounting hardware is not a viable option.  They also work on a variety of hard shell boats with either peaked or domed foredecks, and in a situations where the rig needs to be made level, or lifted over deck hardware.

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They can be quite useful for sailing borrowed or rented boats, and we’ve found them ideal for doing water trials with the under-the-hull strap, since the cradles help keep the rig from tilting.

There is a semi-circular groove cut into the top of the main cradle to accept the cross tube.   There is also a flat channel on both the main and front cradle to accept the main body tube. P1050168P1050167

 

 

 

 

To install them, simply bend the included piece of wire over the section of foredeck where you want the cradle is to sit.  Trace the shape of the wire on the cradle at the desired height, and cut with a sharp kitchen knife, razor, or band saw (if you have access to one).  It’s really that easy.
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The Y40 foam is a little more expensive than Minicell, but in our minds it’s well worth it.   It’s quite a bit denser, provides much better support, and is easier to shape to a smooth finish.

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We are now offering these on the website!  Please feel free to contact us.  🙂

Aleut Paddles and Paddle-Sailing

October 3rd, 2014 by

“What’s up with the skinny wooden paddles?”

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This question comes up every now and again, so I thought that I would write a little about this style of kayak paddle and why we like to use it for paddle-sailing.

My intent here is not to persuade you to change the paddle you are currently using, as most paddle-sailors have their own likes and dislikes.  I simply wish to introduce you to this unique paddle and do my best to review it’s qualities.

Over the years Patti and I have used a variety of paddles with the Kayaksailor, each having their own advantages and disadvantages, and the one that seems to stand out in terms of performance and “feel” is the traditional, Aleutian Island double blade. You’ve probably noticed these long wooden paddles in our photos and videos.

It’s an old school design, developed by the Aleut, who are the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific.91210 The Aleuts are masterful watermen, who with limited resources, created astonishingly sophisticated skin-on-frame sea kayaks called  Baidarkas, and paddled them with refined paddles.  How old is “old school” you ask?  Well… no one knows for sure. Evidence suggests that long before the human migration across North America to Greenland, people paddled the waters of eastern Siberia and the northern Pacific island chain in kayaks.  While some of the earliest archaeological evidence of skin-on-frame boats dates back at least 2000 years, some have found artifacts related to kayaking, such as paddles and deck rigging components, dating back as far as 5000 years. In short, Pacific kayakers have had plenty of time to refine their gear.

Even with today’s advanced computers, in my mind the traditional designs of the Aleuts reached an apex in skin-on-frame kayak sophistication and craftsmanship.  These remarkable people routinely paddled very long distances, often in extreme weather conditions, hunting sea mammals, fish, fowl, and whatever else they could find.  Life must have been tough there, as these islands are some of the most desolate, windswept rocks on the planet.  Not only did they manage to survive, but they were able to craft cool gear that was efficient and stylish as well.

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Back to the paddles.  While it has been well documented by early Russian explorers that a shorter, canoe-like, single blade paddle was frequently utilized and was often seen kept on deck as a spare, Aleuts also developed a fine, long, flexible, double blade for long distance, high speed, cruising.  This is the style of paddle we use.
They work very well.  Since we often find ourselves in strong breezes and choppy seas, covering long distances at relatively high speeds, we too are able reap the benefits of the design.P1040409

Aside from the natural beauty of oiled wood, one of the first things most people notice about the Aleut paddles are their relatively long length and the narrow blades.  Our own paddles are (244cm) long and (8.3cm) wide at the widest point and are quite a bit longeP1040963_2r than most Greenland style paddles. The length and the narrow blade shape is designed for prolonged, shallow (less vertical) strokes.  And this, combined with ample flexibility in the shaft, is gentle on our aging shoulder joints.  These attributes also allow for effective paddling in very shallow water, a real plus for inshore cruising.  Additionally, the low angle arc of the blade in the air is less prone to come in contact with the sail, also a plus for paddle-sailing.

Another advantage of using this paddle with the Kayaksailor, is that the blade closest to the water, with its narrow face, can fit easily in between the boom and the foredeck.  This is especially convenient on beam aP1040992nd closeP1050076

reaches  where the boom is set half way out and the gap between the boom and deck is less than on, say a broad reach or a run.  The image on the left shows a more common mid-sized touring blade, and while there is still distance under the boom, narrow blades definitely have an advantage here.

In general, narrow blade faces are easier to control in strong winds. They are far less likely to get ripped out of our hands in the intense 30-40 knot wind gusts, which are all too common here in the Gorge during the summer months.  Wide style blades, with the majority of their surface area concentrated near the ends of the shaft, can suddenly catch a wind gust and become difficult to control.  Many paddlers using wide blades simply feather the blade angles in an effort to reduce this windage, but we’ve found that at least for kayak-sailing when it’s really windy, the narrower non-feathered blade is just easier to use.

P1040996_2The paddle shafts have a comfortable, ergonomic oval shape to them, which lets us know the blade orientation, making themP1050072 easier to brace with in an emergency, since there’s never a question of whether the blade is flat against the water or not.  Additionally, the small unfeathered blades can be conveniently slid under the cross tube, making them easy to stow.

The long paddle length is good for steering and can be especially useful while sailing.  P1050049When doing a stern rudder stroke, the blade can be P1080656positioned closer to the stern where it can better act as a rudder, and the forward sweeping stroke is able to start closer to the bow, allowing the bow to be pushed sideways more effectively.   A long paddle increases bracing leverage, and offers increased stability during paddle-float, and float-less re-entries.

That said, longer paddles can be a disadvantage in certain situations. Paddling in close quarters, one is more likely to hit rocks or other kayaks with the blades. They also require slightly more attention when in areas of dense sea plants. P1080635In this case, a delayed or exaggerated stroke finish is needed to let the plants clear from the blade face before lifting it from the water. Fortunately, the proximal blade transitions from the shaft smoothly and plants slide off relatively easily.  Also, since the paddles don’t have ferrules in the shaft, storage and transportation can sometimes be an issue.  I’ve seen some cool wood Aleut paddles with ferrules, but I can’t help wondering if the shaft strength would be somewhat compromised. Paddle-float reentries in rough water can be stressful on a paddle.

P1050046 P1050048Unlike the much more popular wooden Greenland paddles, most examples of Aleutian double blades have asymmetrical faces, meaning, one side of the blade is shaped differently than the other. The power face of the blade (normally facing the back of the boat), has a raised longitudinal ridge running down center line, and the backside has a slightly convex, or somewhat domed shape to it. The ridged power face helps prevent the blade from chattering (moving erratically up and down) during the power phase of the stroke, as well as helps direct the water down the face of the blade.  The domed back allows the water to move around it with little, if any, cavitation (the formation of air bubbles from the low pressure).  The result is a blade that is both quiet and powerful, and allows for a smooth comfortable stroke.

P1050039For bracing under sail, the ridge-less, domed back slides over the water’s surface nicely. For this reason, we’ll often subconsciously flip the blade over while sailing.

Lastly, the satiny texture of the oiled cedar just feels really good in our hands.  It’s a natural feeling.  Plus, since wood is a better insulator than carbon, our hands stay warmer on those cold days out on the water.

P1080648Our paddles came to us already pre-shaped by Corey at the Skin Boat School in Anacortes, Washington (Washington State). The paddles are not made in the traditional way, by carving a single piece of wood, but created by laminating several cut pieces together. In this case, red cedar and a spruce core, for a good combination of light weight and strength.

If you are interested in making your own paddle, or learning more about Aleutian island designs, a web search should yield enough information to get you started.  We definitely recommend giving this style of paddle a try.  And, please let us know what you think!

We hope you’ve have enjoyed this post.  Please feel free to leave a comment.  🙂

Fair Winds and Happy Sailing!

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Greetings Kayaksailors

October 3rd, 2014 by

Greetings Kayaksailors!

Wow! thanks to all of you, we’ve had a very busy season.   It’s thrilling to help so many people get into paddle-sailing!

Finally! we are glad to have a little free time to spend on the blog.  Between building rigs, answering e-mails, and of course feeding our ravenous kayak-sailing addiction, our blog posts and website updates have been sadly neglected.   Now that the days are getting shorter and the water is starting to cool here, we are beginning to have some more free time.

Tomorrow I’ll be posting a article on “Aleutian Island Paddles and Paddle-Sailing” that you may find interesting.

Anyway,  just wanted to say Hi, and it’s great to be back!

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Fair Winds and Happy Sailing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sun Dreams

December 18th, 2013 by

Hi everyone!  Here is a new video.   Yaaay!!

If you haven’t tried creating a video with movie making software yet, we highly recommend it.  It’s super fun.

Patti and I always try to have a camera on us while we are out on the water.  It’s amazing how often we see beautiful things while sailing.   Whether it’s simply sea creatures going about their day, or the way reflections of light dance on the ripples, being on the water seems to capture the imagination.  At least it’s this way for us.

Several companies make small, affordable, waterproof cameras that are easy to use.  Most people have seen the GoPros but there are many models available to choose from.  We like to use cameras with an easy to see LCD screen on the back so we can see what we are shooting.    Ours reside inside the chest pocket of our PFDs, where they’re leashed with a thin bungee cord to that little clip that is designed to hold your car keys.  And, since our sails do most of the work, we can set our paddles down and capture that special image or scene with just a moments notice.

We hope you enjoy watching this video and look forward to seeing yours soon!

Feel free to leave a comment.

If you’d  like, subscribe to the blog in the right hand column to receive our new posts via e-mail the moment we post them.

Smiles,

David and Patti

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